Does Soundproofing with Egg Boxes Really Work?

Eggs in an egg box

Last updated: July 28, 2020 at 9:46 am

A popular way people think they can soundproof a room is with egg boxes. It’s long been thought that egg boxes are soundproof and using them will block any noise.

So, can you soundproof a room with egg boxes?

The simple answer is no. Egg boxes aren’t any more soundproof than a bookshelf or extra insulation.

The myth came from acoustic panels. They look very similar to egg boxes but are built entirely different and have special features to block noise. These are very common in recording studios or drum rooms.

It’s not to say egg boxes are completely useless, they do reduce some noise. They just aren’t efficient when is comes to noise reduction.

Egg boxes (or anything in a similar shape) work by sending sound waves in different directions with their shape, reducing echo but not sound. This is called sound deflection.

This is why acoustic panels, which are shaped like egg boxes, are so popular in recording studios as they reduce echo for the performer.

The Difference Between Egg Boxes and Acoustic Panels

Acoustic panels
Acoustic panels look like egg boxes

As mentioned above, egg boxes are often confused with acoustic panels. These are egg box lookalikes and are made of very dense material to adsorb sound.

From the picture it’s clear why they’re often confused.

Acoustic panels are often heavy and clear a room of any unwanted noise pollution. Generally the heavier the panel, the better the quality therefore the longer they last.

Panels also block noise from entering or leaving a room, so you can be as loud as you’d like without annoying the neighbours.

Are Egg Boxes Soundproof at All?

Egg box soundproofing isn’t the best idea, however as they are not smooth, sound dissipates by sending waves in different direction, and reduces echo.

They are an okay and cheap solution if you’re looking for very basic soundproofing, but as I’ve mentioned above there are better alternatives.

What to Use Instead of Egg Boxes

1. Acoustic Panels

As mentioned above, acoustic panels are my #1 solution for soundproofing a room. They are specifically designed using dense rubber as they absorb and dissipate sound either entering or leaving a room.

3. Soundproof Blankets

Soundproof blankets are a bit out there, but they are a great DIY soundproofing material. The thicker the blankets the better.

They work as they’re made of million of fibres, and as sound hit them, they move and break up any sound waves.

2. Soundproof Curtains

Similar to blankets, soundproof curtains can be used to stop airborne sound from escaping or getting in through windows.

Windows are a usually a good source for sound to get through, so a good set of curtains can will stop the majority of sound.

They also work the same as blankets. As sound waves hit the curtains, millions fibres disrupt sound waves and stop the majority penetrating.

4. Acoustic Door Threshold

Even if you’re looking for egg boxes to soundproof your wall or ceiling, a lot of sound can get in or out of your door.

Airborne sound gets through gaps in your door, especially at the hinges or the bottom of the door.

Door thresholds are perfect for this purpose. Simply fix a threshold (can be rubber or wood) to the bottom of your door and get it as close to the floor as possible. This is leave as little room as possible for sound to pass through.

Summary: There are Better Options than Egg Boxes

Even though egg box soundproofing isn’t the best, they can offer a cheap soundproofing solution. Their shape redirects sound waves and reduces echo, so if you’re looking for a fast DIY job then egg boxes could work.

I would however recommend better solutions such as acoustic panels or soundproof blankets for more professional soundproofing.

Egg boxes can be okay to record YouTube videos in your bedroom, but not much more.

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About the Author: AJ

Hi, my name's AJ! I write about living a quieter life, soundproofing tips and recommending the best quiet products here on Quiet Living.